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Moving to Denver
#1
So I just got a job in Denver and will be moving there in a few months. I've got a glock 17, and from what I've read I can just bring it there with no registration or anything (from California). I was reading about the 15 round mag limit and was wondering if mag blocks were okay or if I needed to get rid of my 17 round mags. I originally got them from a dealer in CA with 10 round blocks installed, so would 15 round blocks be legal in CO?

Is buying a gun in CO pretty easy? Just like buying anything else? Background checks, waiting times?

CCW's are nearly impossible to get in California, but if I wanted one in CO what's the process? Do I have to establish residency first, if so how long do I have to wait?

Any other general info you can give me would be extremely helpful too!

Thanks,

Steven
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#2
Steven,

Welcome to Colorado! (well, almost).

That's a lot of questions, and some don't have easy answers. But I would imagine that you will find it WAAAAAY easier than Kommiefornia.

1. Assuming you had the mags prior to July 1st 2013, you shouldn't have to worry about them. After that, they have to be permanently blocked to 15 or less. BUT, nobody seems to be pursuing prosecutions on this law. In fact, to date, only one charge has ever occurred that we're aware of, and I don't know the outcome of that. AND, that charge was only an "add-on" to a lot of other significantly more serious charges (menacing, threatening, etc.).

2. Buying in CO is very easy by comparison. You will need a full background check, unless it's a bona fide gift (not straw purchase) between close family members - there's a list of approved relations. The background check is usually less than 10 minutes, and I'm usually approved before I finish the actual transaction. On one purchase, I was delayed due to the local gun show going on, and it came back in four hours.

2a. Wait times? What wait times? :)

3. CHP (it's proper nomenclature here) can very from county to county. The state is "shall issue" unlike that bullshit in CA. However, some county sheriffs will make you wait the full time, or find any excuse to deny you. But they have to show cause. The only county where CHPs are not issued by the sheriff is Denver, which is handled by the Chief of Police - and its arguably the most annoying county. But two friends of mine are in Denver County, and they got theirs in three weeks' time. And the husband has had some...spotty...legal history (nothing that should get him denied, though).

3a. The fee used to be capped at $152.50 (which included the CBI background check), but C.R.S. 18-12-205(2)(b) appears to have changed this to $100. This seems to be confirmed with a person I conversed with on DefensiveCarry.com, who also is a Jefferson County resident (i.e., he didn't have to pay the additional $52.50 which was for the background check).

3b. I haven't ever heard of a residency time requirement. BUT, you can only apply in the county in where you live, or where you OWN a business. That means business owners can apply potentially in the county where they work, but their subordinate employees cannot.

4 - Other info. If you are going to live in Denver city/county, then understand they have some rules that do not apply to the rest of the state. For example, we are an open carry state EXCEPT for Denver, which they won in a lengthy legal battle a few years ago. Denver also does not allow "assault weapons", but IIRC you can still have them in your residence and transport them to otherwise gun-friendly areas (like a range). What does that mean in reality? Who knows. This is why I refuse to live inside Denver boundaries.

4a. If you plan to live in or occasionally travel to the west side of Denver, come visit! I'd love to meet up with members. I usually shoot at Bristlecone



For the state laws regarding firearms, check out the Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 18, Article 12 (all parts). They can be found at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/. Also check out http://handgunlaw.us/states/colorado.pdf for a more concise review. Gary Slider maintains that site, and he's been known to pop up here when he needs help updating the content.
JackRock
Lakewood, CO
http://ryancash.co
Charter Member, Bristlecone Shooting Center
Reply
#3
(03-30-2017, 08:00 PM)JackRock Wrote: Steven,

Welcome to Colorado! (well, almost).

That's a lot of questions, and some don't have easy answers. But I would imagine that you will find it WAAAAAY easier than Kommiefornia.

1. Assuming you had the mags prior to July 1st 2013, you shouldn't have to worry about them. After that, they have to be permanently blocked to 15 or less. BUT, nobody seems to be pursuing prosecutions on this law. In fact, to date, only one charge has ever occurred that we're aware of, and I don't know the outcome of that. AND, that charge was only an "add-on" to a lot of other significantly more serious charges (menacing, threatening, etc.).

2. Buying in CO is very easy by comparison. You will need a full background check, unless it's a bona fide gift (not straw purchase) between close family members - there's a list of approved relations. The background check is usually less than 10 minutes, and I'm usually approved before I finish the actual transaction. On one purchase, I was delayed due to the local gun show going on, and it came back in four hours.

2a. Wait times? What wait times? :)

3. CHP (it's proper nomenclature here) can very from county to county. The state is "shall issue" unlike that bullshit in CA. However, some county sheriffs will make you wait the full time, or find any excuse to deny you. But they have to show cause. The only county where CHPs are not issued by the sheriff is Denver, which is handled by the Chief of Police - and its arguably the most annoying county. But two friends of mine are in Denver County, and they got theirs in three weeks' time. And the husband has had some...spotty...legal history (nothing that should get him denied, though).

3a. The fee used to be capped at $152.50 (which included the CBI background check), but C.R.S. 18-12-205(2)(b) appears to have changed this to $100. This seems to be confirmed with a person I conversed with on DefensiveCarry.com, who also is a Jefferson County resident (i.e., he didn't have to pay the additional $52.50 which was for the background check).

3b. I haven't ever heard of a residency time requirement. BUT, you can only apply in the county in where you live, or where you OWN a business. That means business owners can apply potentially in the county where they work, but their subordinate employees cannot.

4 - Other info. If you are going to live in Denver city/county, then understand they have some rules that do not apply to the rest of the state. For example, we are an open carry state EXCEPT for Denver, which they won in a lengthy legal battle a few years ago. Denver also does not allow "assault weapons", but IIRC you can still have them in your residence and transport them to otherwise gun-friendly areas (like a range). What does that mean in reality? Who knows. This is why I refuse to live inside Denver boundaries.

4a. If you plan to live in or occasionally travel to the west side of Denver, come visit! I'd love to meet up with members. I usually shoot at Bristlecone



For the state laws regarding firearms, check out the Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 18, Article 12 (all parts). They can be found at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/. Also check out http://handgunlaw.us/states/colorado.pdf for a more concise review. Gary Slider maintains that site, and he's been known to pop up here when he needs help updating the content.

Wow, thanks for such a comprehensive answer! Everything sounds so much easier than things in california where I've got to google and double check everything before doing anything.  Sounds like unless you're a blatant criminal or unstable you should be able to get a CHP even in Denver.  With that said, that's still MILES easier than trying to get a carry permit in here...Thanks again, I'll have to check out Bristlecone after I settle in! 
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#4
(03-30-2017, 09:03 PM)Steventw Wrote: Sounds like unless you're a blatant criminal or unstable you should be able to get a CHP even in Denver. 

That's pretty much it. And frankly, if you can handle CA's process, you can handle CO's process EASILY. The law states it should take no more than 90 days. If the Sheriff doesn't have a reason to deny, they must issue the CHP. However, the law does allow for a Sheriff to find a reason after issuance and revoke the permit. It's super rare, but has happened a few times.

We also don't have that silly "registration" crap. You don't have to report all of your boom sticks to law enforcement

Steventw Wrote:I'll have to check out Bristlecone after I settle in!


I have a guest pass with your name on it (courtesy of my membership)!
JackRock
Lakewood, CO
http://ryancash.co
Charter Member, Bristlecone Shooting Center
Reply
#5
(03-31-2017, 10:23 AM)JackRock Wrote: That's pretty much it. And frankly, if you can handle CA's process, you can handle CO's process EASILY. The law states it should take no more than 90 days. If the Sheriff doesn't have a reason to deny, they must issue the CHP. However, the law does allow for a Sheriff to find a reason after issuance and revoke the permit. It's super rare, but has happened a few times.

We also don't have that silly "registration" crap. You don't have to report all of your boom sticks to law enforcement



I have a guest pass with your name on it (courtesy of my membership)!

Hey, I'll take it! Just give me a few months 
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#6
Way to be on it JackRock!
Smileak
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#7
Well, I'm finally in CO! Moved into an apartment in Douglas county which seems to be pretty easy to get a CHP so I'll look into it soon. That being said I don't want any problems with the law if/when I do carry. So rather than starting a new thread, does anyone here know if mag blocks are legal? I realize most LEO's don't care for the law and don't enforce it but I'd rather be safe than sorry. If I do use a block to make my mags 15 rounds do I need to have them epoxied shut to make them "Permanent?"
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#8
(06-05-2017, 07:26 PM)Steventw Wrote: Well, I'm finally in CO! Moved into an apartment in Douglas county which seems to be pretty easy to get a CHP so I'll look into it soon.  That being said I don't want any problems with the law if/when I do carry.  So rather than starting a new thread, does anyone here know if mag blocks are legal?  I realize most LEO's don't care for the law and don't enforce it but I'd rather be safe than sorry.  If I do use a block to make my mags 15 rounds do I need to have them epoxied shut to make them "Permanent?"

The statute is silent on that specific instance, and with only one charge under this law, there's precious little case law to refer to. This is something only a lawyer could have a chance to answer, and even they may not have a strong surety on their answer.
JackRock
Lakewood, CO
http://ryancash.co
Charter Member, Bristlecone Shooting Center
Reply
#9
CRS 18-12-301 (2)(a)(I):

A fixed or detachable magazine, box, drum, feed strip, or similar device capable of accepting, or that is designed to be readily converted to accept, more than fifteen rounds of ammunition;

So the question you need to answer is: "I'f I'm sitting at the defense table with my lawyer, how easy will it be for the prosecution to remove my blocks to convice the jury that they're 'redily convertable' to accept more than 15 rounds?"

O2
When seconds count, the police are mere minutes away...
They'll never take your "hunting rifle", they'll call it a "sniper rifle" first.
Gun registration is gun confiscation in slow motion.
Zero failures comes at infinite cost.
You are the FIRST responder. Police, fire and medical are SECOND responders.
By eliminating fear of guns you'll put fear back in criminals.
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#10
(06-10-2017, 09:06 AM)O2HeN2 Wrote: CRS 18-12-301 (2)(a)(I):

A fixed or detachable magazine, box, drum, feed strip, or similar device capable of accepting, or that is designed to be readily converted to accept, more than fifteen rounds of ammunition;

So the question you need to answer is: "I'f I'm sitting at the defense table with my lawyer, how easy will it be for the prosecution to remove my blocks to convice the jury that they're 'redily convertable' to accept more than 15 rounds?"

O2

Good point.  I've got my 15 round blocks epoxied to the spring.  Now that I'm settled I'm looking for some concealed carry classes.  Any recommendations?  I've seen a bunch for about the same price but don't want some hack that pushes customers through the minimum to get your license. 
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#11
Just go to Bristlecone. They can take care of you

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